Raw and Rebel: Handpicked Brutalist Decor Collection

Raw and Rebel: Handpicked Brutalist Decor Collection

Raw, rough, wild. How “beautiful” trio is it? Brutalist design, which emerged in architecture in the 1950s and 60s and spread to the world of design with sharp metals, monolith blocks, raw concrete furniture and decorative items, is like a rebellious scream. We have prepared a special selection for the brutalist style decor, the harsh brother of industrial design. Explore these “rebellious aesthetics” pieces, some dating back to the 1960s, some produced by contemporary artists and designers.

1. Bronze Sculpture Titled ‘Reading’ by George Koras

Made in the 1960s by New York sculptor George Koras, the statue depicts a reading female figure in accordance with the Brutalism style. If you love the brutalist style bronze figurative sculpture, don’t miss this woman!

2. Aaron Chairside Table by Bernhardt

A strong and dramatic Brutalist end table design with its irregular geometric base and smooth graffiti coating surface. It is sure to go well with industrial style living room and office decoration.

3. Brutalist Coffee Table, 1960s

The vintage coffee table from the 1960s, made of cast steel, has the characteristic block design and primitive texture of the Brutalist style.

4. Tom Greene Custom Made Brutalist Mirror

The original vintage mirror from the 1970’s has exactly the worn elegance you are looking for with its burnt and rusty appearance.

5. Spectacular Brutalist Lamp by Tom Greene

Let’s share one more design from Tom Greene. The pointed-edged chandelier will give you the feeling of knights resting on your door with its worn alloy material. It has been waiting to be yours since the 1960s.

6. Brutalist Candleholder, 1970s

The candle holder from the 70’s is made of aluminum. Doesn’t it look like concrete? Burn candles for wild romance!

7. Panavista Dining Table | Stanley Furniture

The most modern among the products on our list. This dining table where concrete floor meets glass is great for Brutalist kitchens and dining rooms. If you do not like the products with too much worn or sharp edges, if you like the plain aesthetics of concrete, it is definitely a timeless and useful table design.

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Bauhaus is Not Dead, Lives in Our Hearts And Homes
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